Making your own Sour Cream – Several methods

by on February 28, 2013 » Add the first comment.
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Method 1

I N G R E D I E N T S
1 cup cream
1 tablespoon cultured buttermilk
Recipe can be increased at the ratio of 1 tablespoon buttermilk to 1 cup of cream.

I N S T R U C T I O N S
In a double boiler bring the fresh cream up to 180 degrees. Cool to room temp in a cold water bath. Add the buttermilk, cover, and let sit at room temp. for 24-48 hours. Stir and refrigerate. The batch will keep approximately 3-4 weeks, refrigerated

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Method 2

I N G R E D I E N T S
1 cup cream
1 1/2 cups pasteurized whole milk
1/2 cup buttermilk

I N S T R U C T I O N S
Mix all the ingredients in a bowl over warm water. Raise the temperature of the mixture to (68 degrees to 70 degrees F) and let it stand for 12 to 24 hours or until it is sufficiently sour and thick enough to cling firmly to a spoon. Keep in the refrigerator until you want to use it. For a richer heavier sour cream combine 2 cups of pasteurized heavy cream with 5 tablespoons of cultured buttermilk and incubate as before. For better texture refrigerate for 24 hours before serving.

Method 3

SHORTCUT RECIPE

I N G R E D I E N T S
* 1 cup heavy cream if you prefer a thick, creamy sour cream, or light cream for a smoother, lighter consistency
* 1 rounded tbsp. sour cream
* Bowl
* A sterilized pint jar

I N S T R U C T I O N S
Step 1:  Put the sour cream in the bowl and gradually add the cream, whisking as you add it. Make sure the two are thoroughly mixed.
Step 2:  Pour the mixture into the jar. Cover with waxed paper and a lid. Let the jar stand at room temperature for 24 to 48 hours, or until it has a firm consistency (when the jar is tilted, the cream should retain its shape).
Step 3:  Refrigerate the cream in the covered jar for 12 hours before using it.

Method 4

I N G R E D I E N T S
1 CU heavy cream
1/4 CU sour cream or buttermilk

I N S T R U C T I O N S
1. Mix heavy cream and sour cream or buttermilk in a screw-top jar
2. Cover, and let stand at room temperature about 24 hours until very thick.

SOUR CREAM NOTES, TIPS, HINTS, AND INFO

Sour cream is commonly used for dips, dressings, and sauces or simply “plain” as a condiment.

Never boil sour cream because it will curdle immediately. To add sour creme to a hot liquid, remove the liquid from the heat source (or turn the heat to very low) and add the cream while stirring gently.

Avoid using sour cream in dishes with a lot of salt, as the salt may cause curdling. Also dishes made with sour cream do not freeze well

Baking With Sour Cream
Cakes using acidic ingredients such as sour cream may development a metallic flavor if baked and stored in an aluminum pan. To prevent this reaction from taking place, line the bottom of the pan with parchment paper before adding the batter to the pan.

History and Use
Sour milk products including yogurt, kefir, kumiss, and sour cream have been used for centuries by eastern cultures including the Arabs and the Bulgars. Throughout history popularity spread to Germany, as well as Eastern and Central Europe and to the Americas as well.

Sour Cream Substitutions and Equivalents

Equivalents for 1 CU Sour Cream:

> For baking: 7/8 CU buttermilk or sour milk plus 3 TBL butter.
> For baking: 1 CU yogurt plus 1 tsp baking soda.
> For baking: 3/4 CU sour milk plus 1/3 CU butter.
> For baking: 3/4 CU buttermilk plus 1/3 CU butter.
> Cooked sauces: 1 CU yogurt plus 1 TBL flour plus 2 tsp water.
> Cooked sauces: 1 CU evaporated milk plus 1 TBL vinegar or lemon juice.
> Dips: 1 CU yogurt (drain through a cheesecloth-lined sieve for 30 minutes in the refrigerator for a thicker texture).
> Dips: 1 CU cottage cheese plus 1/4 CU yogurt or buttermilk, briefly whirled in a blender.
> Dips: 6 OZ cream cheese plus 3 TBL milk, briefly whirled in a blender.
> Lower fat: 1 CU low-fat cottage cheese plus 1 TBL lemon juice plus 2 TBL skim milk, whipped until smooth in a blender.
> Lower fat: 1 can chilled evaporated milk whipped with 1 tsp lemon juice.

Let stand 5 minutes to thicken.

Notes

This cannot be made and used in the same day. If you do not have time to make your own sour cream, use the Substitutions and Equivalents suggestions.

Plan ahead to give the sour cream 24 hours to thicken up and chill. Time is required for the chemical reaction to produce your sour cream.

There are many substitutes for sour cream, depending on the recipe and your specific needs. Yogurt is an excellent substitute for sour cream in most recipes, but keep in mind it is thinner in texture. Thicken yogurt by draining through a cheesecloth-lined sieve over a bowl in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes.

 

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